Tuesday, February 7, 2012

Full Service Grab 'N' Go Canned Soup Part 3: Layered Chicken Veggie Soup

This Grab 'N' Go Canned soup, Layered Chicken and Veggie, was suggested to me by a reader and as much as I've searched, I cannot find the site that was suggested to me originally, I'd really like to give credit for this idea where credit is due... however, my feeble mind can't find it. I made it to take to work for lunch on those days I don't have leftovers, and don't want to order in.

That being said, this soup was so much fun to make and turned out so great...

Here's what I did...

First I cooked my chicken, seasoned well with salt, pepper, garlic, and some poultry seasoning. After the chicken cooked and cooled, I removed it from the bone and chopped it up. I let the broth cool overnight, then removed as much of the fat from the top as I could and set it aside to use in a later step. (I ended up using about half a 3 pound chicken, I used the other half of the meat in my chicken chili).



I peeled, sliced, and chopped the vegetables I chose to use... potatoes, onions, frozen corn, green beans, and carrots. (I used fresh veggies except the corn, which was frozen... I do not recommend using previously canned vegetables, they've already been cooked and will become way too soft during the pressure canning process)

Here are the approximate amounts of ingredients used:
2-3 potatoes, peeled and diced
2 carrots, peeled and diced
1 large onion, chopped
1 to 1-1/2 cups green beans, strings removed and broken in bite sized pieces
2 cups frozen whole kernel corn
1-1/2 lbs. chopped chicken
Hot chicken broth


After all my ingredients were assembled, I began filling my hot, sterilized wide mouth pint jars with layers of vegetables and chicken... I'm guessing at quantities here, maybe 1/4 to 1/2 cup of each veggie... more potatoes, less onion... use your own judgement here, it's a matter of taste... also if you prefer peas to green beans, feel free to substitute... I wouldn't use pasta or rice in this dish... they'd get WAY to mushy. There's also no rhyme or reason for the order the layers go in... I chose by color, light colors and white, followed by bright colors of carrot, green been, etc.


Once I had my chicken and vegetables layered in the jars, I filled the jars with hot chicken broth left over from cooking my chicken, I ran a butter knife between the inside of the jar and the food to remove air bubbles.


I wiped the rims of the jars and added the hot, sterilized lids and rings, tightening them on to fingertip tightness.


I place the jars into my pressure canner and processed them (use the instructions that come with your canner) at 10 pounds of pressure for 70 minutes for the pints (quarts would process for 90 minutes).

After processing, I allowed the pressure in my canner to drop on its own to ZERO before taking off the lid and removing the hot jars using my jar lifter. I set the jars on a folded dish towel on the counter to cool and seal. I LOVE the PING of each successfully sealed jar! Music!

For a printable copy of this recipe, click here.


Canning Granny©2012 All Rights Reserved


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51 comments:

  1. Worked great. Family wanted more. While traveling this was very handy.

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  2. Looks really yummy.. Have you tried this with barley? I follwed a recipe I found online (will link you :) ) Dh shook my jars so mine looks ugly but tastes yummy . I am printing all 3 of your recipes to add to the book!!! Thank you again
    Gert
    http://creativechicksatplay.blogspot.com/2009/09/soup-starter.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gerty, Have not tried it with barley, but I'm thinking it would be yummy. Thanks for the support! ~~Granny

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    2. Never use any grains in canning! They are one of the major no-nos! This includes, but is not limited to, pasta, rice, barley, etc. Not only are they unsafe, they will be total mush after processing. Commercial canners can use them because they have access to methods and equipment home canners don't. They also have millions of dollars to spend on researching to find safe processes to use, and to buy insurance if something bad happens to somebody who eats their product.

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  3. One of the tips I can give you is to use vinegar on the towel to wipe the jars if you are going to use meat in your jars. It will eliminate and residual fat that may be on the rim. Great soup and your potatoes will be fork tender! Keep up the great work!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for the tip and thanks for your support (I "tested" a jar of the soup yesterday... it's YUMMY!) ~~Granny

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  4. I don't have a pressure cooker so can I also use a water bath. Thank you so much tinkerella1@aol.com

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    Replies
    1. Anything with meat or low acid foods (like carrots and potatoes) MUST be pressure canned... sorry now way around it! ~~Granny

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  5. Hi Pamela:
    I enjoy your blog and I would like to recognize you by awarding your blog the Versatile Blogger Award. If you would like to accept it, please go to my blog to receive it here:

    http://whitewolfsummitfarmgirl.blogspot.com/2012/02/versatile-blogger-award.html

    If you do not accept blog awards, please let me know and I will forward it to someone else instead.

    Thank you,

    Heidi

    ReplyDelete
  6. I just found your blog tonight. Before I know it ,I had spent an hour reading it. I have read every post. From your soups to your canned pumpkin. I will definitely be following you . I really enjoyed your post.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you so much for reading Michelle! ~~Granny

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  7. That clinches it, I'm telling my hubby he's GOT to buy me a pressure canner. I want to make this!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Wow that soup looks great! Like my grandmother used to can and I have never had the nerve to can. You are talented. I followed you over here from Heidi's blog. Nice to meet you and I now follow you.
    Dolly

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much Dolly... I enjoy Heidi's blog as well.~~ Granny

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  9. Do you have to use a pressure cooker? I had just seen the Ball Starter Kit at Walmart for $11. I want to try canning, but don't want to go all crazy incase it's not for me. I LOVE the idea of soups and stews to can.

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    Replies
    1. Tabby, Yes, when processing stews and soups, you must use a pressure canner. ~~Granny

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    2. Thank you....Are they pretty easy to use? I found one at Walmart for $25. I don't trust buying used from a Thrift Store yet I don't want to go all crazy for my first time. Wondering if that one would be okay.

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    3. Pressure canners are easy to use as long as you follow the instructions that they come with. I've never seen one for as little as $25, are you sure it was a pressure canner... or was it maybe a pressure COOKER? Two different animals! ~~Granny

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  10. Excellent post! Good informational blog for us canners. I'm new at canning and I found this blog through Pinterest. I will defiantly be making this soup tomorrow. I raise my own chicken and just roasted one off tonight. I cleaned the bones then boiled down the bones for some stock. It's all waiting for me. I got a new pressure cooker today also. One with a dial so I can see the poundage. Can't wait to use it! (and put up some soup for this winter). I'm now following you. ~Dawn @ www.hissyfitsandhalos.net

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for reading Dawn and welcome to my world!This is one of my favorite soups, LOVE it! ~~Granny

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  11. you can find the original source for this recipe at www.junkersjunk.blogspot.com. It was originally suggested by a man named Marty Junker on the Canning page on Facebook, and he has the details on his page. :) I am sure he adapted it from somewhere as well, but wanted to make sure you had this just in case. :)
    Thanks
    Heather from The Welcoming House Blog

    ReplyDelete
  12. Can this soup be canned using raw, cubed chicken (skin & fat removed)? The only difference I see in Ball's cold pack canned chicken is that it is canned in room temp jars.

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  13. I'm a little surprised at how full you fill your jars. I've researched this because I personally like more solids than broth in my soups. The "official" wisdom seems to be no more than half solids, and the rest broth. What is your opinion about that? I've raw packed other things, like tomato juice, and had a problem with it really expanding in the jar, and then one jar kind of exploded out the top when I took it from the water bath.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When canning soups according to the USDA guide for soups, you use half solids, then fill with liquid. Then process for only 60 min. pints and 75 min. in quarts. This is more like a stew that is not thickened. You can fill the jar up to 1" headspace with solids if you process it as for meat, which is actually 75 min. for pints (not 70 as the recipe states here) or 90 min. for quarts.

      The Ball Blue Book and Ball Complete book of Home Canning are also recognized authorities on canning and they do not specify the half solids/half liquid ratio for their soups.

      With foods exploding out of the jar, it is usually a problem of not leaving enough headspace. That is VERY important for proper canning. Different foods require different headspace, but generally anything pressure canned needs 1' headspace. Jams, jellies, and relishes need 1/4" or less.

      If you BWB, be sure to wait 5-10 min. after removing canner from burner and removing lid from canner before removing jars from canner. When PC'ing, let pressure drop normally to zero, remove lid, wait 5 min. before removing jars from canner. This wait time allows the food in the jars to stabilize to room temperature/pressure more slowly. Also, maybe your lids were not on tight enough.

      Delete
  14. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  15. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  16. How many jars did it take for this recipe?

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    Replies
    1. I think I got 7 pints Cheryl. ~~Granny

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  34. We located your blog through another facebook canning blogger and have fallen in love with it. We have canned since the 4th over 14 quarts and 16 pints of chicken and 16 pints of your layered chicken and veggie soup (which we got into today for lunch and added some orzo to it and it was great) and 7 quarts of ground hamburger and plan on making your hamburger and veggie soup next and we still have some more chicken and veggie soup to can. We also have canned some salsa today. Thanks for all the work to blog and share your knowledge with us.

    ReplyDelete
  35. I make soups all the time, but do not add potatoes. I use them the first batch, and did not like the taste. Have you ever eaten store bought canned potatoes? That is what everything in the jar tasted like; carrots, celery, everything tasted like canned potatoes! Now I make soups without potatoes. If I want some potato in my soup, I cook it up while reheating the soup. Usually though, I prefer pasta or rice in soups

    And, PLEASE do not use a metal knife to remove air bubbles! You can leave tiny scratches or nicks in the glass which weaken it and can cause breakage. Use a plastic or wooden tool. I've used a wooden chopstick, a plastic knife, or, my favorite, a part of a bamboo tongs that broke apart at the hinge. On the bamboo, I made marks 1" and 2" from one end to help me measure head space and water in the canner without having to have an extra ruler taking up space.

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  36. If it was Marty Junker who suggested it his blog is here
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